Faculty

New Faculty 2016-17

2016-17 marks the beginning of another outstanding year for UT Computer Science, with the addition of six new faculty in the fields of quantum computing, computer vision, natural language processing, and theory. This builds upon the very successful 2015-16 academic year, when UT Computer Science recruited four new assistant professors in systems and robotics, ensuring a vibrant future for computer science education and research at The University of Texas at Austin.

UT Austin Villa Wins at 2016 World RoboCup

The UT Austin Villa robot soccer team, led by University of Texas at Austin computer science professor Peter Stone, returned from the 2016 RoboCup competition in Leipzig, Germany as the world champions in the 3D Simulation league and with an impressive second-place win in the Standard Platform League (SPL).

Why is CGI in the Movies Still So Hard?

College of Natural Sciences | Point of Discovery

As the summer movie season kicks into high gear, we talk with a scientist about some of the challenges in simulating the way everyday objects behave on the big screen through computer generated imagery (CGI). Etienne Vouga's computer simulations have helped bring to life a wizard's hair in The Hobbit and clothing in Tangled.

New Method of Producing Random Numbers Could Improve Cybersecurity

With an advance that one cryptography expert called a "masterpiece," University of Texas at Austin computer scientists have developed a new method for producing truly random numbers, a breakthrough that could be used to encrypt data, make electronic voting more secure, conduct statistically significant polls and more accurately simulate complex systems such as Earth's climate.

Lorenzo joins academy of distinguished teachers

Lorenzo AlvisiLorenzo Alvisi has been selected as one of just seven new members of The University of Texas at Austin's Academy of Distinguished Teachers for his sustained and significant contributions to education. Lorenzo will be part of a central core of teachers who serve as a resource and aim to be an inspiration for other teachers, and promote a sense of

David Zuckerman's award from the Simons Foundation

David Zuckerman has been selected as a Simons Investigator in Theoretical Computer Science. David's research focuses primarily on pseudorandomness and the role of randomness in computing. He is best known for his work on randomness extractors and their applications. His other research interests include coding theory, distributed computing, cryptography, inapproximability, and other areas of complexity theory.

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