#ProcrastinationThoughts

As finals are coming up, and deadlines for projects approach along the horizon, I have found that I am guilty of procrastination on so many levels.

Procrastinating occurs through habit, mindless action, and/or intentional avoidance of responsibility. Whether watching a late night show of celebrities doing peculiar acts, reading blog posts, or surfing Facebook on the latest memes or doggo content, I've found procrastinating to be focused on activities that have some to little/no value in the moment.

The Philosophy of Computer Science

"Every science begins as philosophy and ends as art." -Will Durant

As the semester progresses and classes are really getting to the heart of their respective subjects, I've noticed that two of my classes especially have quite strong parallels.

The two in question are Data Structures and my political philosophy class, and the more I think about it, the more I see the similarities in them. There is a certain duality to philosophy that mirrors that reminds me of the binary aspects of computer science. They both have an innate sense of balance within them, a sort of "zen" if you will.

Hack Tech Organizer Life

This past semester, I got accepted as a tech organizer for Freetail Hackers. By joining them, I've been able to have the wonderful opportunity to partner with many other students at UT with the vision of making hackathons smoothly run and amazing. I have to say that I really loved being in the org. The community within Freetail Hackers is really amazing, not only because of the miscellaneous Assassins games we hold or the various number of memes that get shared, but also because of all the amazing leaders and skilled organizers I get to meet and work with in the org.

The Benefits of Personal Projects

Hard at work

Hello dear reader!

As the semester comes to an end, many of you may be looking eagerly towards summer vacation. Perhaps you have an internship lined up or are involved in research for the upcoming months. But even if you don't have a specifically structured plan, there are still many ways to be immersed in computer science on your time.

CS Struggles

Hello dear reader!

With midterms week just around the corner and projects piling up, I think everyone is feeling pretty frenzied. And with that, I've been thinking a lot about what exactly it is that computer scientists do, and I think I may have figured it out.

We fail.

It's true! I don't know if anyone has ever written even a marginally complicated program without the compiler finding something wrong with it. CS is all about finding your errors, fixing them, and then getting twenty new errors for your trouble.

Reflection

When I came to college, I didn't really come with much passion for CS. Sure, I came in with a lack of clarity in what the future held and a bright amount of curiosity as a freshman. I had a far-reaching desire outside of class to try out new things, scour the school for free food and shirts at events, and traverse through many different orgs surrounding the inner campus. But when it came to programming, I had considered it more of a matter-of-fact chore to do. Having taken CS classes in high school, I assumed much of programming to be self-explanatory.

Looking Back

Hello dear reader!

If you're a college student reading this, you probably don't realize, or even care for that matter, that for high school seniors, the deadline for college decisions is quickly coming up. And with that, all my younger friends are calling me up for advice on all things college.

While talking to them, I came to remember the person I was when I was in their shoes last year, and realized that even though I have only been in college for a year, I've  already changed so much.

How to Hackathon

Hackathons are really fun. Unlike college, where most projects in class are set in stone, hackathons are loosely structured, which gives a lot of flexibility on the wide range topics that can be pursued in 24 hours. Things can become easily scattered, though, even when there is a set theme behind a hackathon. Which means one of the first (and hardest) steps that need to be taken is to come up with an idea to work on.

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The views, opinions and positions expressed by the authors and those providing comments on these blogs are theirs alone, and do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or positions of UT Computer Science, The University of Texas or any employee thereof.

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